Tag Archives: Memoir

Questions to an Author: Martha Graham-Waldon P2


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Hello world, let’s continue from where we stopped yesterday, click here if you didn’t read that – Martha’s been a very deep soul journey

5. So overall, how have you been coping this far?

Writing my memoir helped me reconcile myself to my past and it has helped me to live more fully in the present. I have connected with so many people who have had similar experiences and now I am a speaker for NAMI giving presentations in high school on mental health and suicide prevention. All of that has been tremendously rewarding.

3) The Writing

  1. Did any books/memoirs influence your writing (style, presentation, content)?

The Memory Palace by Mira Bartok offered encouragement to me to tell my story. It is about her experiences living with a mother with mental illness. The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls is another exemplary memoir that will soon be made into a movie.

  1. Did you have a writing mentor?

I utilized methods taught by Brooke Warner and Linda Joy Meyers of the National Association of Memoir Writers http://namw.org/ to sort through my writing and create a scaffolding and timeline of important turning points in my life. Studying the memoir writing genre connected me with a vibrant writing community online and in real life.

  1. Which was the most difficult chapter to write in your memoir and why?

I called one of the last chapters in my book “The Hardest Chapter”. I suppose you will need to read the book in order to find out why that is.

  1. Which was your favourite chapter to write and why?

My favourite parts of the book are the chapters in Part One called “The Magic” because as I wrote these chapters I was able to escape back into the memories of a mostly happy childhood.

  1. Did you learn anything from writing your memoir and if yes, what was it?

I learned that I am not alone in my experience. Writing my memoir was a very healing and cathartic experience and it has been gratifying to be able to help others through their healing process as well.

How long did it take you to write and get the memoir published?

It took me about seven years to write the book and find a publisher. Once I signed the contract, it took another 13 months for it to actually appear in print.

4) The Message

  1. Do you have any advice for other memoir writers especially on challenging subjects like mental health?

Study the memoir writing genre and connect with the memoir writing community. I took memoir writing courses offered through the public library and online. Read as many memoirs as you can. All these things will help you find your own voice. Don’t get discouraged and try to write a little each day, even if it’s only for 15 minutes.

  1. Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Early treatment and diagnosis are important so you should seek professional help if you suspect you or a family member is experiencing a mental health crisis.

  1. Any other writing projects, blogging etc?

I am currently writing a novella, my first attempt at fiction. I don’t blog regularly but I admire those that do!

  1. Where can your memoir be found?

On Amazon, through Barnes & Noble, Kobo; my publisher Black Opal Books, and Scribd. Here are the links:

Amazonbarnes & Noble: Kobo: Black Opal Books: scribd:

Thank you very much Martha for answering our questions. We hope to stay informed of any updates with your projects.

About Martha

Martha Graham-Waldon is a writer, mental health advocate and armchair activist who resides in the Santa Cruz Mountains of California with her family and a menagerie of pets. Her articles have been published locally, internationally and online. She is a winner of the 2015 Women’s Memoirs contest for a vignette based on her memoir in the anthology Tales of our Lives. Her memoir Nothing Like Normal—Surviving a Sibling’s Schizophrenia was published by Black Opal Books and is available on Amazon. In addition to writing, Martha loves travel, the outdoors, Jazzercise and music.

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Questions to an Author: Martha Graham-Waldon


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Hello World, during this month of May which is Mental Health Awareness month, I am as you must have noticed, doing interviews with authors who have written on mental health, especially about their personal experiences.

I have done a modest review of Martha’s memorable memoir on my blog, and it is my honour to interview her too. Having had a sibling with a mental illness (bipolar disorder), I can relate with much of what Martha writes.

1) The Profile

  1. Let’s Start with a brief introduction of yourself – your background – and a tiny bit about your Childhood:

Thank you, Marie. I was born and raised in Southern California in a family with four kids, I was the youngest. I have to say that my childhood was pretty idyllic. We were raised with an appreciation for nature and a social consciousness as well. When my sister entered adolescence, problems surfaced that affected our entire family and particularly me since I looked up to her so much.

  1. About your Memoir, how did you come up with this poignant title?

When I first starting writing, my working title was A Normal Life. This was based on a feeling I had during those challenging years that I just wanted “a normal life” although I finally realized that there really is no such thing. However, a fellow author pointed out to me that this title could be construed as sounding boring. I posed the question to the other authors in my publisher’s author group and someone came up with Nothing Like Normal which can be interpreted as either a good thing or a bad thing or both! I thought this was perfect so I went with it after adding the subtitle Surviving a Sibling’s Schizophrenia.

2) The Soul Journey

  1. What is your take about mental health?

I think it is important for anyone dealing with a mental health challenge or that of a family member to realize they are not alone in what they are experiencing. Mental Illness is very widespread. According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI), one in five youth experience a mental disorder at some time and the figure is one in four for adults. Therefore it’s important to not be fearful of accepting a diagnosis of mental illness. It needs to be treated like any other medical illness and families and individuals should take advantage of the many resources that are available to help them cope with these conditions.

  1. Did your feel guilty for your sibling’s deteriorating mental health? If yes what did you think or do, if no please explain some to us.

In my memoir, there is a chapter that talks about siblings experiencing a “survivor syndrome” in which they wonder why their sibling was afflicted with a mental illness when they were not. Often times a sibling or parent may feel helpless when they are unable to “fix” the problem that their loved one is experiencing. My advice is that you must focus first on being healthy in your own life. Achieving your own happiness and stability is the best way to help your family member because you will be coming from a place of love as well as empathy.

  1. Can you tell if there was a difference in the way your sibling was treated before and after she got that diagnosis?

There is a definite stigma surrounding mental illness and this was even worse in the 1970s when my sister was first diagnosed. Stigma is a negative label that was placed on her and caused people to treat her differently. Stigma is hurtful and makes people feel ashamed of themselves or their family member. Feeling stigmatized and criticized can lead to individuals not seeking help for their mental health issues. To combat stigma, it’s important to realize and explain to others that mental illness is actually a medical illness like any other physical illness. Just like diabetes is a disease of the pancreas for example, mental illness affects the brain.

  1. If you wouldn’t mind, can you tell us any short or long term effect to your own mental health as a result of your sibling’s mental illness?

I became very depressed as an adolescent because that is a difficult time for most people when hormones and societal expectations create pressure on one’s sense of well-being. I did develop coping mechanisms like meditating, playing the piano and writing that helped me feel more whole and I continue to use these healthy outlets to this day.

Please stay tuned for Part 2 tomorrow, thank you

Book Review: Bipolar 1 Disorder : How to Survive and Thrive by Molly Mchugh


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A mental illness definitely strips a person of so much; yet there is hope!!!

Introduction

I wish to begin my candid review of this epic memoir by expressing my gratitude to Molly for having stuck through with writing this memoir. She kept this dream alive for 20 years and I find this generous. Generous also because of all she shares in there – from a very personal and equally professional perspective. Here is someone who fell sick; lost her mind on some occasions; got diagnosed with one of those dreaded labels; witnessed the system’s ‘stagnancy approach to mental health’ from both sides (as a care worker and as a mental health consumer’, and was ‘kindly’ harassed into withdrawing from medical studies with no one held accountable. But, the deal for me is reading on to find out how she survived and is now thriving as best as she can. I have learnt so much not only from reading Molly’s memoir, but also from interacting with her online.

The personal narration

Brought up a catholic, Molly probably knows the dogma of retribution being a direct consequence of our sins or ‘short comings’. It is easier to blame a mental illness on the person suffering same, or their family and upbringing. In this respect, a lot of prayers are said by the family of such a person in total faith and hoping for a miracle. This is some of Molly’s journey although this approach doesn’t work out well and Molly goes from one misadventure to the next. Her personal narration equally covers her ‘merry go round’ with the search for ‘balancing the chemistry’ in her brain through some psychotropic drugs with each having its of pros and huge cons. Physical ailments join in the mix or maybe were even there all along and just can’t take the toxic chemical assail any more without crying foul. Molly is lucky to find a doctor or two who is patient and thoughtful enough to go to the bottom of her physical predicaments to prescribe some alternative treatments. These alternative treatments, including those Molly researched by herself and even natural ones like the sun and thyroid supplement, are all part of the big wrap which enable Molly to survive her Bipolar 1 diagnosis and eventually thrive.

The Scientific narration

Molly’s memoir is not only about her personal journey, it is also about a lot of scientific information and material the average mental health patient and yes even some doctor may be unaware of. Molly shares insights into her research both off and online in her quest to better understand what the ‘heck’ is going on in her brain and life. She also makes a strong and corroborated case for the need for both the scientific and mental health community to be and stay informed of the evolution of psychology, psychiatry and pharmacology mindful of the giant pharmaceutical industry. Molly seems to point out something I had baffled at when I visited the US – Mental illness seems to be all about pills regardless of how bleak statistics are turning in. Fortunately, there are voices of hope out there, although they may be threatened a drown – they are there.

The debilitating narration

I refrained from including this under Molly’s personal narration because it seems to be the trend for many suffering from a mental illness. That mental before the big word illness does so much disservice to the person, their family and even community as a whole – perplexedly unlike with physical illness. Once you get a mental illness diagnosis be it of bipolar 1; 2; Schizophrenia; borderline… you name them, a lot is stripped off you. If you are lucky to be treated as a human being any more, you still come to realize you belong to the category next to guinea pigs or pets for whom either despise or exaggerated pity is the new kindness. There is so much stigma and the community is hyped with fear of this mental ‘nuts’ roaming the streets instead of being locked up for good. You learn very quickly to not mention the word mental again if not relationships will keep being jeopardized.

My appreciation

This is one more of those books I wish I had read a few years ago because it would have helped me and a sibling. The book is very easy to read because of the simple English used and even the anecdotes to fruits in the scientific narratives. Molly’s sense of humour probably helps her survive and thrive, but it will sure keep the reader interested in reading till the end. Although a mental illness strips a patient of so much, it is possible to face the ‘mental beast’ head on as Molly has done. Indeed, she has not only brought into the world a healthy and full of energy young man now in his young adulthood, but she has been able to go back to finish college and start a freelance career in communication. She is over ten years from her last hospitalization and is ageing gracefully. Who says there is no hope once you get a mental illness diagnosis? Read on, I whole heartedly recommend this memoir and give it a 5/5.

About Molly

molly-and-son

Molly is much more about bipolar than I could do her justice. Here is a glimpse in her own words; check out her website for your freelance writer jobs:

I’m Molly, your go-to gal to get your online writing project done with content that informs, is well-researched, SEO optimized and engages your audience. I will manage your writing projects while you focus on more important things such as running your business. Let me know what type of content you need for what format (blog, website, newsletter) and I will get it done.

You can get detailed information about each of my specialized services here: Blogging, E-books, Website Content, White Papers.

Ahead of my 38th Birthday: My Gift to You with gratitude


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I got the best photgrapher for this one

 

Hello World,

The above pictures show a now, and all the years back … I love them both. In the meantime, what has that lady done with her life so much that she can offer you a gift of it? She has made several interesting twists and turns leading to discoveries which made her loathe herself more before finally loving herself whole. It is one of the memoirs in which I record some of my greatest fears in life and how I have learnt to face them throughout the years thanks in large part to life’s lessons and my shaggy self, which I am offering to you.

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What’s the Worst Case Scenario…

From the 18th of January – my birthday, to the 22nd of January, my fourth and toughest memoir to write, will be free on amazon kindle. I bet you it’ll make a good read. I also hope it’ll convey my gratitude to you all who have in one way or the other impacted me on my earthly journey. It also in total gratitude to my Almighty Father and Mother Nature, that I keep writing and sharing and appreciating and reading and loving and living. I once asked how many times one outght to say thank you, glad I got no answers for I know I’ll always do love saying thank you over and again.

So, without much ado, get your free kindle apps and get set to download this modest gift of mine to you. Tell your friends and family who may be interested in reading such a memoir, it’s also my modest contribution to mental health advocacy – shaming the stigma to be candid.

I know many people wish me well, I wish someone who reads this will go out of their way to honestly tell me what they think about it… it could generously be via a review on the amazon (such a big gift for me), or even here on my blog; whichever suits you. All I really want to say by this post and gesture is THANK YOU – because saying that has never gotten any ackward for me 🙂

The TOC and Preface of yet another deeply honest memoir of mine


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Walking the Talk, unravelling the me within in the process

 

Hello World, as promised in my last post, here is the TOC and more of my forthcoming memoir:

  1. Dedication

  2. Acknowledgements

  3. Previous works by the same author

  4. Foreword

  5. Preface

  6. The Fear of Staying

  7. The Fear of Leaving

  8. The Fear of Losing

  9. The Fear of Failing

  10. The Fear of being Loved

  11. The Fear of Loving

  12. The Fear of stigma

  13. The Fear of Advocating

  14. The Fear of Dying

  15. Epilogue

As usual, I write in all candour and I think I have a better explanation for my style. Let me save that for another post, (electricity supply is out here and my battery is running real low)

The Preface:

What indeed is the worst case scenario when you take that dreadful decision to come out and tell the world that you too have mental challenges? I think some may wonder who or what gives me the authority to qualify my issues as mental challenges. After all, even Jesus was asked by what authority he was casting out demons. I may not have received any ‘official diagnosis’ to say I have a mental illness, but I will not shy away from saying I have my own set of mental challenges which have led me to near catastrophe more than once.

What is the worst case scenario let me seriously ponder! Well, I FEAR what people will say, think or do!!! And now what is this FEAR??? This is what I found: Fold Everything And Run; Face Everything and Rise; False Emotions Appearing Real. Which one is it??? How do I face it? How do I fight it? What do I do with it?

What about the things or issues which are either a result of those mental challenges, or which trigger the mental challenges? Do I fear them in anticipation? Do I fear them in retrospection? Is it worth dealing with them this publicly? Wouldn’t this be another trigger?

You all know how much stigma is attached to that word ‘MENTAL’. To be candid, when I first hear mental health, I immediately sway the ‘crazy’ direction. After all, if nothing is wrong, why the fuss or even mention?. I mean nobody goes whining about their ‘good mental health’ and produce reports and other materials on them. All materials produced for sensitization and all, is geared to helping people stay in good health or get better if they are already sick.

The deal I have come to observe is that, there is not so much written about mental health as much as there is about physical health. More to that, it isn’t so ‘en vogue’ to write about personal experiences with mental challenges and or illness. The stigma and shame is such that people suffering from all this including the conditions themselves, may get desperate enough and consider suicide an option. I admit I once did back in 2009 and even attempted same with a knife.

My message with this other ‘unconventional’ memoir of mine dear reader is straightforward. By sharing my ‘Journey’ with mental challenges, I want all those like myself and in ‘higher spectrum of any mental illness’, to know that they are not alone. I want to cheer us up in my own modest and humble way. I want to keep it real by sharing instances where I have acted out in whatever seemed fit to me in those circumstances – circumstances which in retrospection or even introspection, were mired by mental challenges.

Some say if it runs in the family ( genetics), you stand a risk of having a ‘frail mind or brain’ to put it this simply. And of course there are several other reasons and causes too, including childhood trauma.

Come to think of it, what does the WHO and the good old science pedias tell us about mental health? It is important because it’s deterioration for whatever reason, is what manifests itself through challenges of the mind which occasion the action causing concern. When these mental challenges are not addressed for whatever reason, or worst still wrongly or poorly addressed, full blown mental illness may be the result and the consequences may just be fatal.

Dear reader, I have come to learn to think of the worst case scenario when something starts to ‘bug my brain’. I mean as much as possible. The Fear comes around, and I try my best to face, fight or simply flee away. Gladly, I read so much and interact with all walks of people without fear or favour. That is how I have come to learn of the different stages of mental illness, and really try to stay at level one. We will be looking at them in detail as we move on. The Fears don’t go away just like that, I have no magic wand. Yet as my dear friend Dyane’s forthcoming memoir will illustrate, a new brain can be born from the ashes of the old one.

It is therefore possible to live with a troubled mind especially when one can face these mind troubles. They are not visible like the cancer on your leg which can be tampered with some chemo or other therapy. And that’s one big challenge. How do you face challenges from a mind you can’t even see, not to talk of understand these challenges or even consider them as such.? When Fear is defined somewhere as False Emotions Appearing Real, this is for real. The dread of thoughts which have taken the mind hostage, gradually become real to that same mind which now sends wrong signals everywhere – troubled actions.

I have my journey to share, and I have met and journeyed with others who have shared theirs with the world and myself in all openness. The likes of Pam, Dyane, Linda and Amy Gamble, share their painful journeys and yet these are equally journeys filled with hope. I am however yet to come across any person from my country Cameroon who wants to share, only met some from South Africa online. The stigma here in Cameroon I dare say, is still so strong that even sales of My Brother’s Journey from Genius to Simpleton (about his mental illness and our struggle as a family), are yet to pick up.

The theme for the 2015 World Mental Health Day is Dignity in Mental Health and the Gbm Foundation and Center for Epilepsy and Mental Wellbeing of which I am the Country Director, is organizing a round table discussion hosted by the national radio broadcasting house. Dignity in Mental Health to me starts with the courage to talk about your mental health just like you’ll talk about your physical health. It equally means the braveness to seek for help with any issues threatening your mental wellbeing, just like you’ll visit the dentist with an aching tooth. Above all, this to me means empathy and respect of and for those with a troubling mental health.

The above are the basic interpretation of this 2015 theme for that important day. Stigma and shame have been known to cause havoc in patients and their families. Friends may even just vanish once you are diagnosed or identified to have any mental challenges or illness. Think even of how years back, cancer, aids and other terminally ill patients were ‘feared, shunned and even judged’! This pattern has to be broken, and someone has to take up that challenge.

Dear all therefore, maybe I am one of the brave few in my country who dares to dare to share such aspects of their life’s journey. Yes I am aware of possible impacts on my career and life, but I know someone somewhere will be inspired and motivated out of their ‘darkness’. This is therefore my journey to a new me, a me who wants to keep facing and fighting fear, and also a me who wants to share with the world in all candidness.

I once more sincerely hope this other memoir of mine makes a very good read.

Thank you very much
Thank you very much

F3 to my Memoir: Narcissistic Abuse of Children by Parents and the family traumatic experience, By CB Belgium


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It wasn’t until very recently, that I put my hand sort of on what had been going on in my family of birth. I think I could somehow scientifically figure out what was wrong with dad.  I was also dare I say lucky to have met someone who had lived a similar traumatic experience from a spouse! I was very honoured that he agreed to write a 3rd foreword to my memoir. It is a true life story, and I’ll share his foreword in two parts. Do come back then for F3 (b) in two days.

I agreed with apprehension and yet deep relief when Marie asked me to write a foreword for her memoir on the subject of narcissism. Given that I am still fighting hard to get my life and those of my two kids on track after such a very traumatic experience with a spouse I have come to realise was and is a narcissist, you would understand my mixed feelings.

Most people who haven’t been used as a narcissistic supply, and have never been involved with Narcissism, are not aware of the impact that Narcissistic people can have on their families, children, spouse or even themselves.

Although in an abusive and very challenging marriage, I had never heard about Narcissism until I was in my forties and my wife started to accuse me of being a Narcissist.  Since I was not aware of what she was accusing me about, I needed to understand what or who a Narcissist is. So I went on the Internet and started searching.

After reading a first article about Narcissism I did not recognised my own behaviour, I was only reading things that I had seen, recognised, tried to discuss, tried to change, in the behaviour of my wife. I then had a moment of revelation. I was not the mentally ill person in the family, but I started to realise that my wife was the one having a mental illness. At that moment I could not read much more, it just was to confronting to me.

During the summer period of 2014, after 14 years of marriage, the violent behaviour of my wife became worse each day, at that moment it was not clear what was going on. One day my wife took an axe and smashed the front and tail lights of my car, while the children were around and watching the whole episode. Both of the children started to talk about the incident at school with some teachers, and after several days I was invited by the directors of both their schools, to have a talk about the behaviour of my wife. At one of the schools I was told that my wife was having a mental problem, and that the school had already organised a safe place for both of my children. They told me to take immediately action, otherwise they would!

During the coming days, I contacted a lawyer and asked him to use all legal instruments to get a divorce from my wife. After I made this decision I started to realise that I was actually in an abusive marriage which had already endured for over 14 good years. It was then that I returned with rage to read all I could about Narcissism. Finally I was reading for over 5 hours a day about this mental illness.

This mental illness of my wife almost killed me, but I was not ready to die yet, I had to take my responsibility to teach my children about a life without abuse. I have to finish the project that is called raising children, with an end date of August 2021 when they would have all turned 18. Like in any project you have to constantly update a risk log and initiate actions to minimise the risk. In this case the risk is all kinds of Narcissistic abuse, one of the best counter measures is go no contact with my ex-wife, although it is almost impossible to go no contact when you have children together, at least the contact should be minimised. To be continued…

Book Cover Reveal: Another milestone in the pipeline all being equal


Kindle Cover
Kindle Cover

I have this mantra, about life giving us lessons. I state that I refuse to sit down and take notes. No I go, I learn walking. And though I falter and even stumble, I fight not to fall. But, to be honest, I have lost several of those fights; fallen big time. The saving graze has been in my falling looking up, from whence I derived the energy to rise up and keep walking. This is how I have come to realize that although I be battered in and by life; and may even look so tattered, my spirit is not shattered. I have and still continue to find the strength in what remains. Dear readers, here comes another memoir of mine with the usual goal of inspiring and motivating us all. I know there are cases, yes very difficult case where melancholia and all other disorders and mental challenges make and leave it nearly impossible to find any strength. But to the general, I suggest that it is possible. I am a citizen of both worlds. The ‘normies’ and the ‘challenged’. I refuse to think either label makes survival, failure or even thriving automatic. May this memoir of mine therefore make a goodread.

I had hoped to start working on this in January, but alas all we can do is plan and hope right? Well, we can also keep faith. And this is what I am doing as is. My timeline was to have this ready for the Summer, two months are gone but I could try to catch up in the remaining four or so months. I have so much to be thankful for this year mindful of all the challenges. I actually just received an email from my school in the following lines: ” I am pleased to be able to inform you that you have satisfied the Examiners in the examinations for the above degree at the appropriate standard and may now proceed to prepare a dissertation.” This I have already prepared and got reviewed and all. Submission dateline is March 20th.

Dear gentle followers and readers, I wish us all the best in our endeavours. Yours ever, MerryMarie

Hard Copy
Hard Copy

Book Review: Leaving the Hall light on by Madeline Sharples


If you aren't charmed by those eyes then you mat as well be blind!
If you aren’t charmed by those eyes then you might as well be blind!

Synopsis

When I started researching and reading about Bipolar and related stories, hoping to understand some more to help my brother some how, this was the very first memoir I stumbled upon. I just came upon it on the Amazon and then ended up as a guest on Madeline’s blog.

I found all excuses not to do a book review, the obvious then being that it could trigger an episode in my beloved, and maybe lead to another tragic ending? And then,Sherrey Meyer a dear friend of ours who equally interviewed me recently, did a very befitting review of this memoir. So what was there for me to add? I whined there that I had planned on reviewing the memoir but thought Sherrey’s said it all. Sherrey said no two reviews were the same.

The Memoir

A passion for the piano right from birth
A passion for the piano right from birth

One more pale tale. A poor mother has to bury (in this case, burn) the same child she had birthed and nurtured 27 years earlier. To get such a nightmare a few months to ‘christmas’, is simply put devastating.

There is so much information here about the memoir, the resumes of lessons learnt and persons touched and transformed. I mean, until we (the system) understand what goes on or wrong with the brain, screw it and even us up, we can only but go really ‘crazy’ too.

The boy could not understand what was going on, he tried for 7 years, played excellent music to solace him through, and then shut the toilet door to let himself out of this world.

See that piercing/contemplative stare
See that piercing/contemplative stare

Ha, the grief is unimaginable.

My Take on this work

It was after reading this memoir that I started fearing that something could happen to my own brother. Barely three months later, disaster struck indeed. l had learnt two huge things from this memoir: to keep fond memories (and even fun-less ones), and to grieve it out anyway you can. Do I say I am grateful to Madeline for sharing her story? Yes, her story mindful of the enormity of the tragedy.

I don’t care how Madeline sees faith in any supreme being before or thereafter. Indeed, any ‘religious faith’ may only dance with one’s grief but not with the reality of a precious one’s exist.

What I takeaway, is one more of those instances where a mother’s love is proven beyond reasonable doubt (even this expression may not be the best). I mean, there is nothing to prove right?  It’s your son, your womb, your cross, your trouble? The ‘System’, can only give as much of a damn as the credit cards roll. Even then, there is still a lot of hesitation, lousy actions, reactions and worthless argumentation. Call it procedures, rights or whatever…

If loosing a day old daughter can still haunt me this bad every now and then, what am I to expect of mums like Madeline? She did well to transform his room into her office, dedicate a bench at the park for him, compile his songs into a soon to be released CD, Paul on the Pianoand is in the ranks of the Mental Advocates we proudly are.

My Rating

Yes, another 5 star. Read it for yourself and maybe give less, I dunno. It takes Courage, it takes love, it takes determination and dedication to write it all down.

About the Author

AuthorMadelineSharplesThis memoir of hers and her numerous other poems and works, can be found on her site: Madeline Sharples’ maintains a great blog: “Choices” and I find her choice of theme soul searching. She also writes for several websites including Naturally Savvy, PsychAlive, Aging Bodies, and Open to Hope. Madeline Sharples and her husband of 42 years live in Manhattan Beach, CA.

Ah, just like Danielle Steel, here is another fluent author dealt the fate of writing her own son’s tragedy!